Bear Gallery

  • November 21, 2016

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Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

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Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies  are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

Peninsular Brown Bear (Ursus arctos gyas) in Katmai National Park on the Alaska Penisula. Considered by some biologists to be same subspecies as U. a. middendorffi, the Kodiak Bear. The Kodiak Bear is the largest subspecies of brown bear, with other coastal brown bears potentially reaching nearly as large. In North America, two types of the subspecies are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies.

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Sloth Bear

Sloth Bear

 

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